**Hover the cursor over the boxes for more information about the session**

 

Friday Sessions

Title

Fun with Scaffolds: How to Help Students Become Independent Writers

Come play! This workshop, using a theoretical framework based on Vygotsky’s Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD), provides hands-on practice with a training strategy that includes four kinds of instructional scaffolds—questioning, prompting, cueing, and modeling. Participants will play a game to identify the instructional scaffolds in different scenarios. Additionally, how to “fade” or provide a gradual release of responsibility back to student writers will be demonstrated. Tutors will leave with strategies they can use right away, and directors will leave with a complete lesson plan they can facilitate in their centers that is based on experiential education. All of the materials needed to replicate or adapt this training will be provided. And, it models a fun online learning experience.

Session Type

Pre-Conference Workshop

Presenter

Rebecca Tedesco

Time

2:00PM - 3:30PM

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Title

Opinions: Odd One Out

This small group game is simple, fun, and challenging, It will have participants re-thinking their own perspectives. This is all about tutors shifting their paradigms and realizing that everyone see's the world, and especially the world of learning, from very different lenses. This session is an ice break for tutors to get to know one another and specifically addresses the conference questions about: How can our individual identities, diversities, and uniqueness be celebrated in the writing center? How must they be curtailed?  How are they heard?  How are they silenced? Participants will gain a sense of how being self-reflective practitioners will help them recognize the importance of diverse identities and perspectives.

Session Type

Group Game

Presenter

Jessica Barker

Time

4:30PM - 6:00PM

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Title

Online Escape Rooms: Virtually Engaging Students with the Writing Center

Based on scholarship supporting the benefits of using a gamified approach, this virtual escape room game will model how to use games like this one to engage students with writing centers. The presenter will explain how a similar model is used at their center to introduce students to their center in a fun and playful way while also providing information about resources. In this game, participants will use teamwork to solve puzzles. Participants will also get the opportunity to ask questions about how the game was developed to imagine other ways to use creativity and flexibility in how they approach community outreach at their centers.

Time

4:30PM - 6:00PM

Session Type

Group Game

Presenter

Camille McBride

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Title

Writing Trivia Kahoot

In this session, we will play a Kahoot trivia game, testing our knowledge of writing related questions as well as Rocky Mountain Writing Centers Association information. We will laugh, compare responses, and typically have fun connecting with each other.

Time

4:30PM - 6:00PM

Session Type

Group Game

Presenter

UWSC Consultants

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Saturday Sessions

Workshops

9:00AM - 10:50AM (PDT)

Title

Developing Our Identity: Creating Consultant-Run Assessment Throughout the Pandemic

We believe consultant-run assessment is pivotal for the improvement of writing centers. This workshop will discuss how we enacted this belief by developing an assessment project led by consultants at UC Merced’s University Writing Center, serving a primarily first-generation, multilingual student body. The goal of this assessment was to explore student perceptions of our writing center, writing, and how we can improve our practices to better assist our campus community. We will address our progress in our assessment, engage other consultants in the assessment creation process, and hopefully inspire other consultants to spearhead similar projects.

Session Type

Workshop

Presenter

Jessica Chapman, Adriana Hernandez, Matthew Louie

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Title

Tutoring Flexibility: Results of Overlap in Tutoring and Teaching

In this workshop, the presenters will provide an explanation of their roles in a corequisite English class, facilitating a one-credit writing studio, in support of their first-year writing sequence, including developing lesson plans, group tutoring, and communicating with students. They will share their insights into how some of the lessons they learned can be used in writing center sessions. Participants will be asked to reflect and/or journal on their “go-to” methods in writing center sessions or other tutoring settings. Participants learn methods of reflection, develop appreciation for tutor flexibility, and will take away new practices they can begin implementing in their writing centers or tutoring environments.

Session Type

Workshop

Presenter

Emma Shaul and Annabelle Day

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Title

Radical Reciprocity in Online Spaces

This session will follow a workshop format that mimics the online studios implemented at the presenter’s writing center. The presenters will provide an overview of their studio model and then engage participants in a simulated online studio framed by the concept of “participatory hospitality.” They will share the online tools they have developed, especially those that foster collaboration, reciprocity, change, and community values.

Session Type

 Workshop

Presenter

Abby Bernard and Niah Wilson

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Title

Body Language–Adapting In-Person to Online

How do we build rapport through the digital screen? Learn about best practices and discover how our body language affects students during our virtual synchronous meetings. Two consultants have updated their existing research on body language to help you get hands-on controlled experimentation for what students see during appointments. Come learn about the challenges of current events and brainstorm methods to continue building rapport in a socially responsible way. Prepare for the challenges of the digital world we face today without stressing about the unknown and the unexpected.

Session Type

Workshop

Presenter

Alex Shi and

Sara Bernardo

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Title

Unjudge Someone—The Human Library Experience

At this workshop, you will learn the origin of the Human Library and how one writing center has hosted Human Libraries as diversity events. Presenters will take on the role of book and reader during the session to demonstrate to the audience what the Human Library looks like in action. Participants will then be sorted into breakout rooms and asked to discuss what "story" from their life they would tell and what title they would assign to their book. After breakout rooms, participants will have the opportunity to be a book themselves and share one of their stories. The goal of this workshop is to highlight the importance of individual stories and human connections.

Session Type

Workshop

Presenter

Annette Cooper and Nina Machin

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Saturday Sessions

Individual Presentations

Morning Block A

11:00AM - 11:25AM (PDT)

Title

A Pocket Style Guide to Visually Enhanced Thinking

Many students who learn through visual representation could have an equal opportunity of learning if visual representation was incorporated as a tool for writing. As a way to add more accessible tools, this presenter discusses her image-based version of “A Pocket Style Manual.” Participants will engage in a conversation about using this visually enhanced style guide to help cite sources and discuss the importance of visual representation to help students succeed in their writing.

Presenter

Kayla Arceo

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Session Type

Individual Presentation

Session 1

Title

Writing Impact: Long-term Effects of Writing Center Work

The focus of this presentation is the way in which writing tutoring/consulting works together with other university writing experiences (including writing courses, internships, or tasks for campus organizations) to impact former consultants’ overall long-term understanding of writing. The presenter will focus on the data collected from a survey of writing center alumni. Participants will reflect on how working in a writing center has shaped the way they approach other writing tasks and future goals.

Session Type

Pre-recorded

Individual Presentation

Session 2

Presenter

Emily Holland

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Title

The New English “Standard”: A Case for Dialect Inclusivity in Writing Centers

This presentation examines the effects that “dialect disenfranchisement” has on individual student writers. Participants will engage in a discussion about how they can empower writers while also giving feedback that will support their academic success. Discussion about how dialect discrimination happens, how it can be perpetuated in writing centers, how tutors can combat dialogue discrimination, and how to foster more inclusive and welcoming environments will be emphasized. 

Session Type

Individual Presentation

Session 3

Presenter

Sophia Caligiuri

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Title

The Rhetorics of Silence in the Writing Center

For people of color, silence frequently renders them invisible to the white gaze. For a white audience, silent bodies of color are subjugated bodies, filled not with implication or meaning, but rather blankness and emptiness. This session encourages tutors to consciously reframe and reconsider the role of silence within the space of the writing center and consultation. After establishing the absence of silence in writing center scholarship, the presenter will examine the role of silence as an imposed position and/or rhetorical choice. Participants be empowered to use silence in new ways within their sessions, as well as realize the necessity of reconsidering silence in conversations around marginalization and inclusion.

Presenter

Wendy Chen

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Session Type

Individual Presentation

Session 4

Title

Student Veterans and Writing Centers

This session focuses on the role a tutor can play in helping Veterans transition from the military to a college life. The session will provide information about how tutors can better prepare and assist Veterans in their new roles, how Veterans can benefit from attending writing centers, and how Veterans, with their unique strengths and perspectives, can help us grow as tutors.

Session Type

Pre-recorded

Individual Presentation

Session 5

Presenter

David Barnes

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Title

Supporting First-Generation College Students: A View from the BYU Research and Writing Center

Providing basic writing support is a necessary resource in making a college education more accessible and maintainable—especially for first-generation students (FGS) who are in unfamiliar territory and may require extra support. Understanding FGS’s backgrounds can help tutors more effectively understand and establish expectations and negotiate the agenda of consultations. The presenter will share her methods and introduce the results from her research. Participants will learn potential strategies and engage in discussions about supporting first-generation students.

Session Type

Individual Presentation

Session 6

Presenter

Emily Hopwood

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Title

Consultants in Writing Center Assessment

How will we as consultants know if we are producing better writers without some evaluation system? Objective assessment measures can demonstrate the impact that consultant efforts can have on the students who come to their centers. This session will review what we know from the literature and how writing centers can engage in research to assess their impact. Participants will discuss questions such as “How can consultants be involved in assessing the work of the writing center?”; “Why should consultants care about assessment?”; and, “How can we close the loop and use assessment to shape consultants’ training and practices?”

Session Type

Individual Presentation

Session 7

Presenter

Kathryn Marie Jensen

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Saturday Sessions

Individual Presentations

Morning Block B

11:30AM - 11:55AM (PDT)

Title

Zoom Consultations

This session will focus tutor experiences providing writing and presentation support via Zoom. One presenter will focus on her tutor appointments via Zoom and the complications experienced when working remotely such as student lack of preparation, delays, absences, navigating secondary online platforms, camera privacy, and communication difficulties with administration. The next presenter will discuss the process of tutoring presentations virtually. Participants will gain insight on how to use Zoom features to improve sessions and monitor tutee participation.

Session Type

Individual Presentation

Session 8

Presenter

Nicolette Henry and Brianna Marquez

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Title

Considering Silence: Fostering Critical Consciousness

Tutors should be allies of our students and listen to the voices of those who have been silenced in our academic scholarship and classrooms. This presentation examines compositional studies of African Americans in the 19th and early 20th century and their on-the-margins, free-floating literacy groups that thrived and created composers of both oral and written language in a radically aimed way—much like our attempts as peer-tutors and consultants to foster critical consciousness. Participants will engage in thinking about how tutors must continue to learn the history of those erased from the general narrative that has been told and fuse it into our developing writing center histories.

Session Type

Pre-recorded

Individual Presentation

Session 9

Presenter

Alysha Robinson

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Title

It’s a Funny Story: A Case Study of Humor and Laughter in a Writing Center

This presentation relates the findings of a research project conducted to explore if, when, and why writing center tutors/consultants and clients use humor and laughter during consultations.  Additionally, this presentation offers suggestions to help consultants reflect upon their uses of humor and laughter and to discover ways in which they may use such strategies to build rapport with clients in future consultations. Participants will explore ways to use laughter as a rapport-building tool.

Session Type

Individual Presentation

Session 10

Presenter

Elizabeth Preston

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Title

Navigating Time Constraints and Creating Solutions: Virtual Synchronous Tutoring in International Time Zones

This presentation will raise awareness about basic logistical struggles of international students that are compounded in a virtual environment. The presenters will examine various complications that can arise when student and tutor are in different time zones, such as technological, linguistic, and other barriers. Participants will learn strategies to help navigate these complications, such as designated slots for international students at specific times, more detailed asynchronous consultations, and demonstrating an awareness of the struggles students face.

Session Type

Individual Presentation

Session 11

Presenter

Alixa Brobbey and Isaac Richards

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Title

Háblame en Mi Idioma: Taking Advantage of Linguistic Diversity in the Writing Center

This presentation focuses on the role of tutors as champions of linguistic diversity. Every student or tutor has different linguistic backgrounds that they bring to the writing center, and this linguistic diversity should be seen as a useful tool for tutors. Participants will discuss the benefits of multilingual tutors and explore how tutors can best use their diverse backgrounds to help students. This session will encourage participants to reflect on ways that writing centers can move from enforcing Standard Academic English to supporting linguistic diversity.

Session Type

Individual Presentation

Session 12

Presenter

Stefanie Shepley

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Title

Building Social Connections

During this COVID-19 pandemic, numerous writing tutors currently feel a sense of isolation due to the inability to meet in person. Building strong social connections among tutors can create a community where consultants have a strong network of support and can rely on each other to strengthen the writing center’s ability to serve its campus. This session will focus on building and maintaining a strong community of practice among writing consultants during this pandemic through weekly intentional social event programming. Participants will develop social programming ideas to take back to their writing centers.

Session Type

Individual Presentation

Session 13

Presenter

Jared Sunada

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Title

Correcting Correction

This session will highlight the importance of word choice when working with writers who want to focus on editing. Participants will become more aware of the power, good and bad, that their words contain and learn methods for providing feedback without damaging the writer’s confidence and identity as a writer. Throughout the session, participants will have opportunities to demonstrate what they are learning by applying the concepts to examples and reflecting on how to bring these strategies back to their centers.

Session Type

Individual Presentation

Session 14

Presenter

Sadie Crompton

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Saturday Sessions

Keynote Speaker

12:15PM - 12:55PM (PDT)

Title

Connections We Make & Connections We Take

In this presentation, Alex discusses the power of personal connection through her journey from peer tutor to student teacher. By sharing stories of the relationships she's built as a consultant and educator, she encourages us to think about how this key writing tutor skill can be carried over to other aspects of our lives and inform how we interact with the world.

Session Type

Keynote Speaker

Presenter

Alex Pereyra

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Saturday Sessions

Roundtable

1:00PM - 1:50PM (PDT)

Title

Start Talking: How to Build Inclusive Writing Center Communities by Fostering Discussions Surrounding Anti-Racism and Intersectionality in a Virtual Era

This round table will focus on the ways that writing centers can still partake in social justice work in mostly online platforms. Participants will participate in reflections, discussions, and activities to define diversity and examine what diversity looks like in their writing center work. Studying diversity will allow centers to more consciously shape the cultures they promote become more adaptive to meet the needs of diverse audiences. Participants will be inspired to think about what actional practices they can bring to their writing centers.

Presenter

Kate Carter-Cram, Amanda Hawks, Madison Martinez

Session Type

Roundtable Session A

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Title

Fighting to Work in the Writing Center

In this roundtable discussion tutors will explore the labor required of students of color and those from working-class families fighting to continue tutoring during the COVID-19 crisis. These presenters will share their experiences at an HSI and commuter college, specifically how shutting down in-person sessions required their team to accept fewer working hours while taking on more responsibilities as care-takers, wage-earners, and burgeoning scholars. This roundtable will include the voices of students who got nieces and nephews to their Zoom classrooms, drove parents to the hospital, worked multiple jobs, and translated for their families, all while taking on more leadership in the center. Rather than valorizing this labor, this session provides an opportunity for participants to recognize that their narratives matter and their ideas must be the foundation of any working solutions.

Session Type

Roundtable Session B

Presenter

Jollina Simpson,

Torrie Martin,

Brittany Cox,

Janet Oliver,

José-Angel Corral Rodríguez, Sandy Vasquez

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Title

Tutors Help Tutors Help Students: Why Tutors Should Lead the Online Tutoring Revolution in Observation Practices

With many writing centers transitioning online, it is more important than ever we include tutors in conversations about how observations should work and what makes them effective. This roundtable discussion will focus on conversations and questions about various observation methods, allowing tutors the opportunity to exchange problems, ideas, solutions, and expertise. Participants will become familiar with tools and pedagogy for improving observation culture and methods in their writing centers. Principles discussed — such as tutor/observer power dynamics, assessment choices, and tutoring modes — are applicable to both in-person and online formats and seek to enhance the performance and experience of all tutors.   

Session Type

Roundtable Session C

Presenter

Jasilyn Heaps,

Jay Paine,

Emily Joy Powell

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Title

Your (Not Actually) Cheating Heart: Understandings of Plagiarism in a Primarily Online Professional Graduate Program

Much of what we call "plagiarism" at a university may be better understood as teachable moments, errors rather than moral failings, and writing centers are uniquely poised to challenge this understanding. This roundtable discussion will provide an overview of survey research comparing the understandings of plagiarism among faculty members and students in university/college programs, specifically to identify attitudes toward plagiarism. Participants will participate in the survey to better understand their own attitudes and engage in discussions about how tutors can navigate these consultations to shift them toward learning opportunities for students.

Presenter

Benjamin Douglas Caldwell

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Session Type

Roundtable Session D

Title

Creating Community: Writing Fellows Support During Covid-19

This round-table session opens a space for directors and consultants to discuss the ways that our work in classroom-connected writing fellows programs helps students to create and maintain not only a writerly community, but a campus community. As Covid-19 research is just emerging, this conversation could help jumpstart conversations about the expanding roles of writing centers on college campuses and the ways that writing fellows programs can be structured to meet emerging needs of students and consultants. The session will engage participants in brainstorming, reflection, and problem-solving conversations that will help us make decisions about our writing fellows programs.

Session Type

Roundtable Session E

Presenter

Katrina Bell and

Chris Schacht

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Title

Tutor Identity in an Online Writing Center

Our session will introduce the concept of tutor identity within writing centers and how the shifts from in-person tutoring to online tutoring have this identity. Participants will engage in discussions about how our identities are formed by our experiences and background and how tutors can cultivate our identities and self-awareness, engaging with questions such as how do you feel that your identity has changed as a tutor since being in an online setting and what kinds of unforeseen benefits have we encountered through online learning.

Session Type

Roundtable Session F

Presenter

Dakota Brown and Megan Lolley

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Title

Discussions of the Pandemic

This session will be a discussion for writing center directors to talk about how they are dealing with the stress of the pandemic and the working conditions it has brought about. Participants will be invited to share their pandemic writing center experiences, share their stories, and make connections with their fellow directors in order to alleviate the stress of the previous year and potentially develop tangible solutions to problems they have encountered.

Session Type

Roundtable Session G

Presenter

Clint Gardner

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Saturday Sessions

Individual Presentations

Afternoon Block C

2:00PM - 2:25PM (PDT)

Title

Witnessing as Radical Empathy in Tutorials

The academy is altering faster than ever before – through universal social movements to vital social-distancing practices – and the traditional boundaries of space have begun to dissolve. The role of the tutor, therefore, is no longer one merely rooted to a singular space: we are now accessible from wherever we have the internet, and this abstraction from face-to-face to screen-to-screen has altered our relationship to the emotional work of the tutorial. This interactive presentation will examine what we mean by radical empathy in 2021. Participants will explore how we help ourselves to find new connections in our methodologies in relation to our students, so that we can better help them?

Session Type

Individual Presentation

Session 15

Presenter

David Whelan

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Title

Uncentering the Writing Center

To write, talk, listen—we are told, as tutors—are positive actions. Through these actions, the tutor and the writer purportedly construct a positive space, in which the site of the writing center maintains its activity. This presentation will challenge this idea by arguing that writing and tutoring, as modes of alienated institutional labor and of vital aesthetic, intellectual, and phenomenological engagement, are neither a theoretical pursuit nor a mode of doing. Participants will discuss questions about the ways in which we engage in our own tutorial labor as a given activity in a site.

Session Type

Individual Presentation

Session 16

Presenter

George Kovalenko

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Title

Achieving Anti-Racism: How Tutors Can Be Engines of Social Justice in Higher Education

In this session, participants will learn about ways to create more inclusive spaces in regards to language, dialect, and other forms of expression. Based on the social justice committee at their communication center, the presenters will discuss their research and their current social justice plans. Participants will engage in discussions about what it means to be linguistically inclusive and how we, as tutors, might start to push against the norm of the one “correct” language and how tutor behavior fits into the broader theme of social justice.

Session Type

Individual Presentation

Session 17

Presenter

Emily Burns,

Ayla Schnier,

Grace Brouillette, Lyndsey Slavik, and Teal Borden

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Title

Redesigning Writing Center Spaces Using a Virtual Tabletop

"Gamifying Writing Center Design'' presents a method for (re)designing writing center spaces collaboratively, developed in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The presenters will explain how they used an online virtual tabletop gaming system to reimagine their writing center space and demonstrate how this works at their center. Participants will gain creative and practical ideas for how to redesign their writing centers using collaborative online technologies.

Session Type

Individual Presentation

Session 18

Presenter

Christopher LeCluyse

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Title

Pausing for Breath: Minimizing Writing-Induced Anxiety in the Writing Center

Breath work can be impactful in the writing center space, and acknowledging the anxiety common in the writing process can benefit both writer and consultant. In this interactive presentation, participants will be led through a breath exercise, introduced to a study gathering data on writer/consultant anxiety, and discuss the benefits of breath work in writing center spaces. Participants will learn how tutors might broach the topic of wellness in inviting and un-intimidating ways and discuss the anxiety we encounter as consultants and how wellness exercises may assist us in our work. This interactive presentation provides resources for tutors working with anxious writers.

Session Type

Individual Presentation

Session 19

Presenter

Kayla Deep

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Title

Breaking Up Is Not Hard to Do: The Overlooked Benefits of Disfluency Within Writing Centers

Writing scholars have long studied the positive impacts of environmental schema and routines have on writers and their writing processes. However, by focusing only on the writing process as a routine, many studies overlook the art of “disfluency”—the positive impact of purposeful disruption within the writing process. Participants will learn how practicing disfluency within writing center consultations can foster confidence-building communities where writers can reflect on their acquired skills and make connections with their past and future experiences.

Session Type

Individual Presentation

Session 20

Presenter

Julia Cordova

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Title

LOC-king Out Students: What’s the WC’s Role

As writing centers continue to adapt to the shifting university landscape and reflect on their role in the campus community and higher education, tutors and administrators have a responsibility to evaluate their role in enforcing language hegemony. This presentation reports on the findings of a project examining intake forms and tutor post-session notes to investigate the HOC/LOC model for tutoring and how existing approaches may constrain students and enforce language hegemony. My presentation will provide the opportunity to facilitate a conversation with other tutors and administrators around their intentional practices regarding LOCs. The conversation makes a space to connect any perceived mismatches between client requests and tutor advice regarding LOCs as it may highlight points of the policing of language skills.

Session Type

Individual Presentation

Session 21

Presenter

Julian Wallace

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Saturday Sessions

Individual Presentations

Afternoon Block D

2:30PM - 2:55PM (PDT)

Title

Culturally Sustaining Pedagogies

This presentation focuses on how Culturally Sustaining Pedagogies (CSP) can be used by writing center tutors to sustain linguistic and cultural practices in students' writing. In our current sociopolitical climate, it is imperative that we explore best practices for tutoring students of color, working class students, multilingual and international students, and other students who are marginalized within the university institution. CSP presents an opportunity for writing centers to apply some of these concepts and methods to best serve the students we tutor. Participants will learn ways to implement best practices for marginalized students, to be able to move from the theoretical to the actual, and to gain insight and ideas from one another.

Presenter

Hannah Bergstrom

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Session Type

Individual Presentation

Session 22

Title

Overcoming Imposter Syndrome in the Writing Center

The aim of this presentation is to continue the discussion revolved around the notorious imposter syndrome specifically as it pertains to our current writing center practices. Following a review of literature highlighting research-based strategies that attempt to alleviate imposter syndrome for both writers and tutors, the presenter will offer alternative suggestions for addressing this issue based on their experience as a Graduate Writing Specialist.

Session Type

Pre-recorded Individual Presentation

Session 23

Presenter

Noah Slowik

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Title

Blurred Boundaries

This presentation highlights the way boundaries have been blurred, erased, and produced in writing centers since the pandemic started in March 2020. Participants will explore the opportunities inherent in boundary revisions and the challenges they create for tutors, administrators, and the physical centers themselves. This session will offer participants the opportunity to reflect on their own boundary shifts during this pandemic and evaluate whether some of the changes/accommodations they've been asked to make—both personally and professionally—might continue in the future.

Session Type

Individual Presentation

Session 24

Presenter

Anne McMurtrey

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Title

Why We Still Ain't Out: Constructing a Survey to Combat Heteronormativity within Writing Centers

This presentation highlights the lack of discourse regarding the queer community within centers. The presenters offer their reflections about their center: Why is there a gap in our training around sexual identities and how can we fix it? Are other centers are experiencing this same trend? Participants will think critically about the kinds of training regarding identities within their own centers.

Session Type

Pre-recorded

Individual Presentation

Session 25

Presenter

Brittany Cox and Hannah Guenthoer

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Title

Talking in Turn: An Exploration of Writing Center Consultant Disclosure

Writing centers, whether virtual or in-person, are places where writers share the often deeply personal work that they have done; as consultants, we tout these spaces as comfortable and do our best to make them so. Because virtual synchronous meetings are at once more personal (we immediately disclose personal elements like our home spaces) and less personal (we cannot share a physical document or read body language cues as effectively), our conversations and perceptions of mutual vulnerability become more pressing. This presentation will present survey results regarding how consultants define disclosure in their writing sessions and discussions of how these definitions intersect with peerness and authority.

Presenter

Kristen Wallace

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Session Type

Individual Presentation

Session 26

Title

Writing Intimidation and Linguistic Biases as Obstacles in Writing Center Praxis

By nature of writing centers’ unique position between student and institution, writing centers risk advocating for and teaching standard academic English (SAE) that not only erases linguistic diversity and promotes linguistic biases, but may intimidate students who don’t believe that they have the ability to write well under the rigidity and cultural erasure of SAE. This session will examine the ways in which writing centers may perpetuate students’ writing intimidation through students’ perception of the writing center and  individual tutoring appointments. The presenter will report on findings from a survey distributed to 45 tutors asking about their experiences working with students’ writing intimidation and writing intimidation they have experienced themselves related to SAE.

Session Type

Pre-recorded

Individual Presentation

Session 27

Presenter

Ryann Squires

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Title

What Professors Really Value: How to Read Rubrics Effectively

While it is true that writing centers are “grade free zones,” rubrics are one benchmark that writers and consultants can use to gauge the professor’s expectations for a successful paper. This presentation will provide an overview of personal experiences and relevant scholarship as well as engage participants in conversations about practical application of these principles in everyday consultations. This presentation will help tutors become confident liaisons between rubrics and writers.

Session Type

Individual Presentation

Session 28

Presenter

Paul Guajardo

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